Thursday, September 21, 2006

What To Do?

I can't believe this . . . this is a typical example of what not to do by email. I had a phone interview yesterday and wrote a nice thank you note. She replied and all was well. 10 minutes later I got another email from her that was accidentally sent to me when it was supposed to go to some guy, presumably her boss. Here's the email:

I did a phone screen on her. I don’t think she has what we need for DOM but could be a good candidate for Marketing Manager. Unless you see otherwise I am going to TD her this week and let her know the Marketing Manger could be a better fit.

Presumably TD is turn down or something. Question is, do I write her back and let her know this didn't get to the right person, or do I just let it go? If I write her back, I could potentially embarrass her and not get offered the MM job. If I don't, and she discovers her error, she may wonder why I never said anything. So here is your job, and time is OF THE ESSENCE, write a comment and let me know: do I write her back? Vote yes or no.

7 comments:

Brett said...

Make lemons out of lemonade - depending on how much you want the job.

Variation 1: If you think that you are qualified for the higher position, tell her what experience/projects/qualifications you have that you might not have highlighted in your resume/interview that would make you a good candidate. Be assertive.

Variation 2: If you accept that you might not be qualified for the higher position, but want the other position, go ahead and tell her that you got the email, that you are still very interested in working for the company because of x,y, and z, and ask that she call you at her earliest convienence.

Variation 3: If you don't want either job, let them know that you were happy to interview with them, that you hope that you will have the opportunity to work with them in the future.

That's my advice - call me if you want to chat it out!

Brett said...

Hmmmm... I just re-read that... and it should read to make lemonade out of lemons....


Shame 'bout that.

CCHarmony said...

That's funny! I didn't even catch that at first! I like variation 2. I do think that the lower position would be more suitable. Higher position has too much supervisory, which I just don't like.

Brett said...

Do it, be confident, emphasize the stuff that would make you a good fit, and treat the reply as the opportunity to have a "second," albiet brief, interview.

I think that it is an integrity thing, actually. You should let them know that you did get the email inadvertantly. They'll figure it out eventually - and if you respond to it reasonably, it can only be good for you.

CCHarmony said...

I did it! But kept it short and sweet and told her I enjoyed talking to her, like the company, and welcome the opportunity for a position that would be a good fit. Whew! I'll let you know what happens!

Brett said...

Now the big question is... did she write back?yqnaxah

CCHarmony said...

She actually called! I didn't get an email all morning and panicked but then thought to check my messages. She was nice about it, felt really bad, was horrified, etc. then told me why I didn't get the job and that she wuold keep me in mind for the other. However, they're not filling that one till next year. Sigh.